The window accessory that makes windows easier for anyone to use.

About Our Product

Use

Window Ease™ is not a window. Window Ease™ is the low maintenance universal retrofit which guarantees compliance to all applicable national & local laws, codes and regulations. Window Ease™ attaches to any manufactured single-hung, double-hung or horizontal sliding window.
 

Design

Window Ease™ is designed to be the versatile accessibility solution for new as well as existing facilities. New, old, wood, aluminum, vinyl or steel sliding windows can now meet all accessibility standards. Window Ease™ can be added as needed to any window. In new building, windows are uniformly specified preserving exterior appearance and lowering costs.

Functionality

With Window Ease™, less than five pounds of force will open, close, and latch virtually any window in seconds. A crank handle is utilized for ease of use and a lever type latch, located adjacent to the crank, replaces the stock window's inaccessible, small and out of reach latches. The Window Ease™ latch allows a window to be latched in any position from fully open to fully closed allowing fresh air with added security. With Window Ease™, any window can easily and fully operate with less than 5 pounds of force and meet grasping and reach requirements — Guaranteed.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Does the window have to be installed before installing Window Ease™?

 Yes, as should the wall and sill finishes. Window Ease™ should go in last but before window treatments such as blinds.

Can the device be attached to mulled windows in pairs?


 Yes. In “Ganged” windows sets of two or more, Window Ease™can be installed on one or more of the windows and the controls can be mounted on either side of the window.

Does Window Ease™ require maintenance?

 

No. All exposed parts are metal and powder coated. All interior parts are plated metal, stainless steel or nylon and are self adjusting and self lubricating. Each component and assembly of Window Ease™ must first successfully pass a "torture test" of 30,000 cycles to be included in the Window Ease™ design.

What about really deep jambs and sills?

 

Optional Crank and Latch extensions will accommodate any depth. Extensions are also used to provide accessible kitchen windows by bringing controls out to face of cabinets.

What colors are available?

 


All exposed surfaces are powder coated. The standard colors are white and dark bronze. Custom colors are available. The Crank and Latch are black.

What about window treatments?

 

Window Ease™ blends well with traditional window treatments. Mini-blinds are often hung between and directly from the Window Ease™ covers.

Installation

Additional Information

 Window Ease installation is simple! Window Ease™ installs on any type of vertical or horizontal sliding window (metal, vinyl or wood sash) and each requires less than 1.5 hours using common tools.
 

 The Seven Easy Installation Steps Are:
1. Attach chassis, carrier and sash brackets to jambs
2. Join drive and idler sash assemblies
3. Mount drive and idler chassis
4. Mount power transfer assembly
5. Install drive belt
6. Adjust actuator
7. Snap on covers and attach control handles 

image24
image25

News & Links

Harmonization of Building Codes & Standards and Federal Rules

To this point in time, the national Building Codes and Standards, as well as, Federal Rules have been different in scope and their coverage of building design as they relate to accessibility. The differences are not just between the Federal Rules and the Codes but, between all of the Federal Rules and all of the Codes and Standards. In 1995, The Access Board appointed the ADAAG Review Federal Advisory Committee to make recommendations for a new ADAAG. The Committee¹s membership was a mix of industry, code and agency staff and the process was apply labeled "reg-neg". Short for regulatory negotiation. Typically, federal agencies make rules from behind closed doors with influence provided by lobby to individual federal staffers or to legislators. The "reg-neg" benefited from the broad range of contributors and the "New ADAAG" is in fact, a pretty clear document written in code style language and without the previous commentary language of it¹s predecessor. It was published on September 30th, 1996 as a draft public review document without a proposed rule. It then went promptly behind closed doors for final rule making. Near the completion of the "New ADAAG", the ANSI A117.1 re-development cycle began. Many of the members of the ADAAG Review Committee already were or soon became members of the A117.1 Committee. The ANSI A117.1 has always been developed by a consensus process with a very broad spectrum of membership a process which the "reg-neg" system mimicked. The final draft of the 1998 ICC/ANSI A117.1 was published in October of this year. It contains the same format as the "New ADAAG". The new A117.1 contains no scoping language in the main body but, fully scopes dwelling units ­ both Type A (fully accessible) and Type B (adaptable). It's technical requirements are based on the "New ADAAG" and it's dwellings' scoping is based on the Fair Housing Act. In other words, the basis of an ADA and Fair Housing equivalent building standard resulted. Chapter 11 of the International Building Code 2000, uses the 1998 ICC/ANSI A117.1 as it's design reference and the scoping provisions are being based on the "New ADAAG". It is being drafted to be an ADA equivalent building code. The Feds have been busy in the mean time. In the July/August 1998 issue of the Access Board¹s "Access Currents" the Access Board announced that they were going a step further in harmonization. Currently, the ADAAG is a sub-set of the ADA and it covers Places of Public Accommodation and Commercial Facilities, Public Transpiration Facilities and State and Local Government Facilities. The UFAS is a sub-set of the ABA (Architectural Barriers Act) and covers facilities designed, constructed, altered, or leased with federal funds. Housing is under the UFAS. The Access Board has combined all of the accessibility requirements into one document to be called {rumored anyway} the (ADA)AG/(ABA)AG. The final rule should be out for public review with it's DOJ pre-amble in the early spring of 1999. Further, as rumor only, the Feds will in the spring of 1999, adopt the 1998 ICC/ANSI A117.1 as Rule in order to streamline the technical requirements of the ADAAG/ABAAG and to facilitate harmonization with the International Building Code 2000. Accessible design should become easier over the next couple of years. Access Rules are now out for children's facilities, legislative facilities and correctional facilities. The IBC, International Building Code) will be published and available in January of 2000. With it the work began at the request of the American Institute of Architects 20 years ago will complete. A design or product in California will then work in Georgia. One Building Official, David Mann in Tucson, Arizona, has already started using the IBC. "We will only be using it on an appeal basis until 2000, but we want to start familiarizing ourselves with the new code. We also feel this is a great service to our local architects, and designers, as they can begin acquainting themselves with the new code before it becomes mandatory." 

Building Codes & Standards

Requirements

 

Accessible operable windows are required by all three national building codes — BOCA, SBCCI, and the UBC as well as the current draft of the upcoming IBC. Prior to 1998 included were those operable windows, within accessible spaces, required by Code for ventilation and also those required for emergency escape and rescue. All codes after 1998 additionally require that, if operable windows are provided in an accessible space, no less than one in each room shall be accessible. All Building Codes reference the ANSI A117.1 for technical accessibility technical requirements. Some states, such as California and Washington have created their own requirements for accessible operable windows. The federal government¹s Access Board, with support from the DOJ, also require accessible windows through the ABA, the ADAAG and the UFAS.

Codes & Standards

 American National Standards Institute ANSI A117.1 - 1998 (Scoped by 99BOCA Sec.1108.12, 99SBCCI Sec.1106.10 & IBC2000 Sec.1108.13.: Sec. 506 Windows. Accessible windows shall have operable parts complying with 309 (Operable Parts). Sec. 1002.13 Windows (in Type A dwelling units). Where operable windows are provided, at least one window in each sleeping, living or dining space shall have operable parts complying with 1002.9 (Operable Parts). Each required operable window shall have operable parts complying with 1002.9. ANSI A117.1 - 1992: 4.12 Windows. Windows that are required to be operable by occupants in accessible spaces shall have locks, cranks and other window hardware that comply with 4.25 (Operable Parts).Building Officials & Code Administrators International BOCA - 1999 1108.11 Operable windows. Where operable windows are provided in rooms that are required to be accessible in accordance with Sections 1107.3.1, 1107.3.2, and 1107.4.1, each required operable window shall be accessible, and at least one operable window in each room shall be accessible. Exception: Accessible windows are not required in bathrooms or kitchens. (Note: 1107 references address I-1, I-2, and R-1 occupancies. R-2 Type A accessible dwelling units are scoped by 98 ANSI A117.1 Sec. 1002.13.) BOCA - 1996 1010.4 Emergency escape and rescue. Every sleeping room below the fourth story in occupancies in Use Group R and I-1 shall have at least one operable window or exterior door approved for emergency escape or rescue. 1205.2 Ventilation required: Every room or space intended for human occupancy shall be provided with natural or mechanical ventilation. 1108.10 Controls, operating mechanisms and hardware: Controls, operating mechanisms and hardware, including switches that control lighting, ventilation, or electrical outlets, in accessible spaces, along accessible routes, or as parts of accessible elements, shall be accessible. Southern Building Code Congress International SBCCI - 1999 1106.10 Operable windows. Where operable windows are provided in rooms that are required to be accessible in accordance with Sections 1105.3.1, 1105.3.2, 1105.3.3, and 1105.4.1, each required operable window shall be accessible, and at least one operable window in each room shall be accessible. Exception: Accessible windows are not required in bathrooms or kitchens. (Note: 1105 references address unrestrained | occupancies and R-1 occupancies. R-2 Type A dwelling units are scoped by 98 ANSI A117.1 Sec. 1002.13.) SBCCI - 1997 1005.4 Emergency escape and rescue openings 1005.4.1 Where required. Every sleeping room located on the first, second, and third story or within basements of Group R occupancies shall have at least one exterior emergency escape and rescue opening. 1203.1.1 Light and Ventilation. Every habitable room of buildings hereafter erected shall have one or more windows, unless otherwise specifically provided herein, to afford adequate light and ventilation. The requirements specified in this section shall be considered as minimum requirements supplementary to all state laws regulating light and ventilation. 1106.9 Controls, operating mechanisms and hardware. Controls, operating mechanisms and hardware, including switches that control lighting, ventilation, or electrical outlets, in accessible spaces, along accessible routes, or as parts of accessible elements, shall be accessible. Uniform Building Code 1997 - UBC All operable windows within an accessible space. ICBO interpretation dated December 21, 1998. Window Hardware Accessibility, Section 1105.4.5, 1994 or 1997 editions. "Windows intended for operation by the occupant are those that are available and typically used by occupants without the need for special equipment or effort. All such openable windows within an accessible space fall under Section 1105.4.5."1105.4.5 Controls, operating mechanisms and hardware. Controls, operating mechanisms and hardware, intended for operation by the occupant, including switches that control lighting, ventilation, or electrical convenience outlets, in accessible spaces, along accessible routes, or as parts of accessible elements, shall be accessible. Required operable windows within an accessible space. ICBO interpretation dated December 21, 1998. Window Hardware Accessibility, CABO/ANSI A117.1, 1992 edition Section 4.12. "Windows that are required to be operable by occupants are to comply with Section 4.12 of the 92 CABO/ANSI A117.1. Windows for emergency egress and for natural ventilation would be required to be openable ... and intended for use by the building occupants". 310.4 Access and means of Egress Facilities and Emergency Escape and rescue openings. Access to, and egress from, buildings required to be accessible shall be as specified in Chapter 11. Basements in dwelling units and every sleeping room below the fourth story shall have at lease one operable window or door approved for emergency escape or rescue that shall open directly into a public street, alley, yard or exit court. Escape or rescue windows shall have a minimum net clear openable area of 5.7 square feet. The minimum net clear openable height of 24 inches, width of 20 inches and a finished sill height not more than 44 inches above the floor. 1202.2 and 1203.3 Ventilation. Occupancies customarily occupied by human beings shall be provided with natural ventilation by means of openable exterior openings with an area not less than 1/20 of the total floor area or shall be provided with a mechanically operated ventilation system. Such mechanical operated ventilation system shall be capable of supplying a minimum of 15 cubic feet per minute of outside air per occupant. International Building Code 2000 IBC - 2000 (current final draft language) 1108.13.1 Operable windows. Where operable windows are provided in rooms that are required to be accessible in accordance with Sections 1107.2.1, 1107.2.2 and 1107.4.1 at least one window in each room shall be accessible and each required operable window shall be accessible. Exception: Accessible windows are not required in bathrooms or kitchens. (Note: 1107 references address I-1, I-2, & R-1 occupancies. R-2 Type A accessible dwelling units are scoped by 98 ANSI A117.1 Sec. 1002.13.) 1999 California - DSA Jurisdictional Policy#98-08 January 31, 1999 Resolution: DSA/AC must review any and all work that has operable window hardware that is intended for emergency escape and rescue openings within sleeping spaces. DSA/AC will not take exception to work submitted for approval when accessible window hardware is provided in all required fully accessible rooms serving R Occupancies. 1117B.6 Controls and Operating Mechanisms. Controls and operating mechanisms required to be accessible by Section 101.17.11 shall comply with the requirements of this section. 1997 Washington WA-UBC Sec. 1106.3 Controls and Hardware. 1106.3.1 Operation. Handles, pulls, latches, locks, and other operating devices on doors, windows, cabinets, plumbing fixtures, and storage facilities, shall have a lever or other shape which will permit operation by wrist or arm pressure and which does not require tight grasping, pinching or twisting to operate. 1999 ADAAG Review Draft for development of Proposed Rule 804 Medical Care Facility Patient or Resident Sleeping Rooms. 804.5 Windows. Where operable windows are provided, at least one window shall comply with 309 (operable parts). Each window required to be operable by local code or regulation shall comply with 309. 805 Transient Lodging. 805.2.6 Windows. Where operable windows are provided, at least one window shall comply with 309 (operable parts). Each window required to be operable by local code or regulation shall comply with 309. 

Contact Us

Request a Free Video/Product Info

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Window Ease

1331 Wind Ridge Dr NW, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87120, United States

Office: (505) 856-6632 Fax: (505) 856-6652

Hours

Monday - Friday

8:00am - 5:00pm


Saturday & Sunday

Closed